REVISE: DNS Problem and Resolution

Question: Solving Other Common DNS Problems

This section lists several common DNS problems and explains how to solve them.

Event ID 7062 appears in the event log.

If you see event ID 7062 in the event log, the DNS server has sent a packet to itself. This is usually caused by a configuration error. Check the following:

  • Make sure that there is no lame delegation for this server. A lame delegation occurs when one server delegates a zone to a server that is not authoritative for the zone.
  • Check the forwarders list to make sure that it does not list itself as a forwarder
  • If this server includes secondary zones, make sure that it does not list itself as a master server for those zones.
  • If this server includes primary zones, make sure that it does not list itself in the notify list.

Zone transfers to secondary servers that are running BIND are slow.

By default, the Windows 2000 DNS server always uses a fast method of zone transfer. This method uses compression and includes multiple resource records in each message, substantially increasing the speed of zone transfers. Most DNS servers support fast zone transfer. However, BIND 4.9.4 and earlier does not support fast zone transfer. This is unlikely to be a problem, because when the Windows 2000 DNS Server service is installed, fast zone transfer is disabled by default. However, if you are using BIND 4.9.4 or earlier, and you have enabled fast zone transfer, you need to disable fast zone transfer.

To disable fast zone transfer

  1. In the DNS console, right-click the DNS server, and then click Properties .
  2. Click the Advanced tab.
  3. In the Server options list, select the Bind secondaries check box, and then click OK .

You see the error message “Default servers are not available.”

When you start Nslookup, you might see the following error message:

*** Can’t find server name for address <address> : Non-existent domain

*** Default servers are not available

Default Server: Unknown

Address: 127.0.0.1

If you see this message, your DNS server is still able to answer queries and host Active Directory. The resolver cannot locate the PTR resource record for the name server that it is configured to use. The properties for your network connection must specify the IP address of at least one name server, and when you start Nslookup, the resolver uses that IP address to look up the name of the server. If the resolver cannot find the name of the server, it displays that error message. However, you can still use Nslookup to query the server.

To solve this problem, check the following:

  • Make sure that a reverse lookup zone that is authoritative for the PTR resource record exists. For more information about adding a reverse lookup zone, see “Adding a Reverse Lookup Zone” earlier in this chapter.
  • Make sure that the reverse lookup zone includes a PTR resource record for the name server.
  • Make sure that the name server you are using for your lookup can query the server that contains the PTR resource record and the reverse lookup zone either iteratively or recursively.

User entered incorrect data in zone.

For information about how to add or update records by using the DNS console, see Windows 2000 Server Help. For more information about using resource records in zones, search for the keywords “managing” and “resource records” in Windows 2000 Server Help.

Active Directory-integrated zones contain inconsistent data.

For Active Directory–integrated zones, it is also possible that the affected records for the query have been updated in Active Directory but not replicated to all DNS servers that are loading the zone. By default, all DNS servers that load zones from Active Directory poll Active Directory at a set interval — typically, every 15 minutes — and update the zone for any incremental changes to the zone. In most cases, a DNS update takes no more than 20 minutes to replicate to all DNS servers that are used in an Active Directory domain environment that uses default replication settings and reliable high-speed links.

User cannot resolve name that exists on a correctly configured DNS server.

First, confirm that the name was not entered in error by the user. Confirm the exact set of characters entered by the user when the original DNS query was made. Also, if the name used in the initial query was unqualified and was not the FQDN, try the FQDN instead in the client application and repeat the query. Be sure to include the period at the end of the name to indicate the name entered is an exact FQDN.

If the FQDN query succeeds and returns correct data in the response, the most likely cause of the problem is a misconfigured domain suffix search list that is used in the client resolver settings.

Name resolution to Internet is slow, intermittent, or fails.

If queries destined for the Internet are slow or intermittent, or you cannot resolve names on the Internet, but local Intranet name resolution operates successfully, the cache file on your Windows 2000–based server might be corrupt, missing, or out of date. You can either replace the cache file with an original version of the cache file or manually enter the correct root hints into the cache file from the DNS console. If the DNS server is configured to load data on startup from Active Directory and the registry, you must use the DNS console to enter the root hints.

To enter root hints in the DNS console

  1. In the DNS console, double-click the server to expand it.
  2. Right-click the server, and then click Properties .
  3. Click the Root Hints tab.
  4. Enter your root hints, and then click OK .

To replace your cache file

  1. Stop the DNS service by typing the following at the command prompt:net stop dns
  2. Type the following:cd % Systemroot % \System32\DNS
  3. Rename your cache file by typing the following:ren cache.dns cache.old
  4. Copy the original version of the cache file, which might be found in one of two places, by typing either of the following:copy backup\cache.dns– Or –copy samples\cache.dns
  5. Start the DNS service by typing the following:net start dns

If name resolution to the Internet still fails, repeat the procedure, copying the cache file from your Windows 2000 source media.

To copy the cache file from your Windows   2000 source media

  • At the command prompt, type the following:
    expand <drive>:\i386\cache.dn_ % Systemroot % \system32\dns\cache.dns
    where drive is the drive that contains your Windows 2000 source media.

Resolver does not take advantage of round robin feature.

Windows 2000 includes subnet prioritization, a new feature, which reduces network traffic across subnets. However, it prevents the resolver from using the round robin feature as defined in RFC 1794. By using the round robin feature, the server rotates the order of A resource record data returned in a query answer in which multiple resource records of the same type exist for a queried DNS domain name. However, if the resolver is configured for subnet prioritization, the resolver reorders the list to favor IP addresses from networks to which they are directly connected.

If you would prefer to use the round robin feature rather than the subnet prioritization feature, you can do so by changing the value of a registry entry. For more information about configuring the subnet prioritization feature, see “Configuring Subnet Prioritization” earlier in this chapter.

WINS Lookup record causes zone transfer to a third-party DNS server to fail.

If a zone transfer from a Windows 2000 server to a third-party DNS server fails, check whether the zone includes any WINS or WINS-R records. If it does, you can prevent these records from being propagated to a secondary DNS server.

To prevent propagation of WINS lookup records to a secondary DNS server

  1. In the DNS console, double-click your DNS server, right-click the zone name that contains the WINS record, and then click Properties .
  2. In the Properties dialog box for the zone, click the WINS tab and select the check box Do not replicate this record.

To prevent propagation of WINS-R records to a secondary DNS server

  1. In the DNS console, double-click your DNS server, right-click the reverse lookup zone that contains the WINS-R record, and then click Properties .
  2. In the properties page for the zone, click the WINS-R tab and select the check box Do not replicate this record .

WINS lookup record causes a problem with authoritative data.

If you have a problem with incorrect authoritative data in a zone for which WINS lookup integration is enabled, the erroneous data might be caused by WINS returning incorrect data. You can tell whether WINS is the source of the incorrect data by checking the TTL of the data in an Nslookup query. Normally, the DNS service answers with names stored in authoritative zone data by using the set zone or resource record TTL value. It generally answers only with decreased TTLs when providing answers based on non-authoritative, cached data obtained from other DNS servers during recursive lookups.

However, WINS lookups are an exception. The DNS server represents data from a WINS server as authoritative but stores the data in the server cache only, rather than in zones, and decreases the TTL of the data.

To determine whether data comes from a WINS server

  1. At the command prompt, type the following:nslookup -d2server < server>where <server> is a server that is authoritative for the name that you want to test.This starts nslookup in user-interactive, debug mode and makes sure that you are querying the correct server. If you query a server that is not authoritative for the name that you test, you are not able to tell whether the data comes from a WINS server.
  2. To test for a WINS forward lookup, type the following:set querytype=a– Or –To test for a WINS reverse lookup, type the following:set querytype=ptr
  3. Enter the forward or reverse DNS domain name that you want to test.
  4. In the response, note whether the server answered authoritatively or non-authoritatively, and note the TTL value.
  5. If the server does not answer authoritatively, the source of the data is not a WINS server. However, if the server answered authoritatively, repeat a second query for the name.
  6. In the response, note whether the TTL value decreased. If it did, the source of the data is a WINS server.

If you have determined that the data comes from a WINS server, check the WINS server for problems. For more information about checking the WINS server for problems, see “Windows Internet Name Service” in this book.

A zone reappears after you delete it.

In some cases, when you delete a secondary copy of the zone, it might reappear. If you delete a secondary copy of the zone when an Active Directory-integrated copy of the zone exists in Active Directory, and the DNS server from which you delete the secondary copy is configured to load data on startup from Active Directory and the registry, the zone reappears.

If you want to delete a secondary copy of a zone that exists in Active Directory, configure the DNS server to load data on startup from the registry, and then delete the zone from the DNS server that is hosting the secondary copy of the zone. Alternatively, you can completely delete the zone from Active Directory when you are logged into a domain controller that has a copy of the zone.

You see error messages stating that PTR records could not be registered

When the DNS server that is authoritative for the reverse lookup zone cannot or is configured not to perform dynamic updates, the system records errors in the event log stating that PTR records could not be registered. You can eliminate the event log errors by disabling dynamic update registration of PTR records on the DNS client. To disable dynamic update registration, add the DisableReverseAddressRegistrations entry, with a value of 1 and a data type of REG_DWORD, to the following registry subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services \Tcpip\Parameters\Interfaces\< name of theinterface >

where name of the interface is the GUID of a network adapter.

Question: What does “Default Server: Unknown” mean for Windows nslookup

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2

I’d like to solve a question with your kind help, about nslookup on Windows. Please see my CMD commands below(run on WinXP SP2).

C:\>ipconfig /all

Windows IP Configuration

        Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : vchjXPsp3MUI
        Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . :
        Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
        IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
        WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

Ethernet adapter LAN1-hostvn1:

        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
        Description . . . . . . . . . . . : VMware Accelerated AMD PCNet Adapter

        Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-0C-29-E0-68-00
        Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
        Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.11.120
        Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.11.1
        DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.11.1
        DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 172.27.0.12
        Primary WINS Server . . . . . . . : 172.27.0.12
        Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Wednesday, August 03, 2011 8:58:19 AM
        Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Thursday, August 02, 2012 8:58:19 AM

Ethernet adapter LAN2-bridged:

        Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
        Description . . . . . . . . . . . : VMware Accelerated AMD PCNet Adapter

        Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-0C-29-E0-68-0A

C:\>ipconfig /flushdns

Windows IP Configuration

Successfully flushed the DNS Resolver Cache.

C:\>nslookup
*** Can't find server name for address 172.27.0.12: Non-existent domain
*** Default servers are not available
Default Server:  UnKnown
Address:  172.27.0.12

> chj.dev.nls
Server:  UnKnown
Address:  172.27.0.12

Name:    chj.dev.nls
Address:  172.27.0.120

>

You can see that I have assigned a DNS server in my IP configuration, but WHY does nslookup spouts

*** Can't find server name for address 172.27.0.12: Non-existent domain
*** Default servers are not available
Default Server: Unknown

What does it mean by saying “not available” and Unknown”.?

The DNS server(172.27.0.12) is working correctly because it answers query of chj.dev.nls as expected. The DNS server is a Win2003 SP2.

Some detail info:

> set debug
> chj.dev.nls
Server:  UnKnown
Address:  172.27.0.12

------------
Got answer:
    HEADER:
        opcode = QUERY, id = 4, rcode = NOERROR
        header flags:  response, auth. answer, want recursion, recursion avail.
        questions = 1,  answers = 0,  authority records = 1,  additional = 0

    QUESTIONS:
        chj.dev.nls, type = A, class = IN
    AUTHORITY RECORDS:
    ->  dev.nls
        ttl = 3600 (1 hour)
        primary name server = nlserver.dev.nls
        responsible mail addr = hostmaster.dev.nls
        serial  = 14716
        refresh = 900 (15 mins)
        retry   = 600 (10 mins)
        expire  = 86400 (1 day)
        default TTL = 3600 (1 hour)

------------
------------
Got answer:
    HEADER:
        opcode = QUERY, id = 5, rcode = NOERROR
        header flags:  response, auth. answer, want recursion, recursion avail.
        questions = 1,  answers = 0,  authority records = 1,  additional = 0

    QUESTIONS:
        chj.dev.nls, type = A, class = IN
    AUTHORITY RECORDS:
    ->  dev.nls
        ttl = 3600 (1 hour)
        primary name server = nlserver.dev.nls
        responsible mail addr = hostmaster.dev.nls
        serial  = 14716
        refresh = 900 (15 mins)
        retry   = 600 (10 mins)
        expire  = 86400 (1 day)
        default TTL = 3600 (1 hour)

------------
Name:    chj.dev.nls

>

Any idea? Thank you.

Answer:

Nslookup will try to resolve the name for the ip address of the DNS server configured as the primary DNS server on the client by performing a reverse lookup of the ip address. If you don’t have a rDNS zone set up for your network/subnet you’ll get the “server unknown” message as nslookup will be unable to resolve the name for the ip address.

It’s not an error condition and won’t cause any problems for normal AD and DNS operations.

Answer:

Your server isn’t returning a reverse lookup for its name. That’s why you’re seeing “Unknown” there. You’ll need to create the appropriate reverse lookup zone to allow your server to reverse-resolve its own IP address back to its name.

Answer:

Well, after adding reverse lookup to my internal DNS server, Default Server now show the domain name of my DNS server.

Sample output:

C:\>nslookup
Default Server:  nlserver.dev.nls
Address:  172.27.0.12

NOTE: If there are multiple names mapping to 172.27.0.12 , Default Server will randomly display one of the names.

enter image description here

Question: NSLOOKUP: *** Can’t find server name… / Default Server: UnKnown

NSLOOKUP is a command line tool which comes with most operating systems and is used for querying DNS servers.

When NSLOOKUP starts, before anything else, it checks the computer’s network configuration to determine the IP address of the DNS server that the computer uses.

Then it does a reverse DNS lookup on that IP address to determine the name of the DNS server.

If reverse DNS for that IP address is not setup correctly, then NSLOOKUP cannot determine the name associated with the IP address.

On Windows Vista/2008, it then says “Default Server: UnKnown”.

On earlier Windows versions, it displays the error message “*** Can’t find server name for address …”.

This does NOT indicate a problem with the actual domain name that you are trying to look up.

It only means that there is no reverse DNS name for the DNS server IP address, which in most cases may not be a problem at all.

To fix this you need to properly configure the reverse zone for the IP address of the DNS server, and make sure that the reverse zone is properly delegated to the server by your IP provider. See the reference article below for more details.

To create a reverse zone in Simple DNS Plus, click the “Records” button, select “New” -> “Zone”, select “Reverse Zone…”, and follow the prompts.

Question: How to fix NSLOOKUP Default Server: UnKnown?

Issue : “Default Server:  UnKnown” error on NSLOOKUP from Windows Server 2008 DNS Server.



Note : To show the server name a Reverse DNS Zone should be configured. If you do not have a reverse DNS configured please look in to my below post which is related to reverse DNS configuration.

http://www.randika.info/2013/01/how-to-fix-nslookup-unknown-cant-find.html

This issue is not a critical one. Even under this error your DNS resolution can work smoothly. But it’s embarrassing when there are issues like this. Right?. Yes I know! me too. 😀

The reason for this is your DNS server does not posses a record for the server itself. Or simply it does not know what is it’s own name. By creating a PTR static entry we can fix this and let DNS server know it’s own name.


1. Open the DNS management console in the Server 2008
        Start > Administrative Tools > DNS

2. Go to the your Reverse Lookup Zone icon and right click on it and select “New Pointer(PTR)“.




3. In the New PTR window enter the  IP address of DNS server and enter(or select) the host name of the server.



4. Now click OK and restart the DNS server service.

Now check to see if it is working.

Question: How to solve nslookup shows unknown for the default DNS server

when i built the Domain Controller with DNS role, i got the unknown default server result when using nslookup

Even the other organization machines in the domain use this server as a DNS server, nslookup still shown the same issue.

After a little investigation i found that, it`s not a critical issue Even under this error your DNS resolution can work smoothly, It means that there is no reverse DNS name for the DNS server IP address, which in most cases may not be a problem at all.

I found a solution says turning on the IPv6 on the NIC will solve this issue, but i don’t want to turn on IPv6, i just want the fix it in IPv4 protocol.

To fix this you need to properly configure the reverse zone for the IP address of the DNS server, and make sure that the reverse zone is properly delegated to the server by your IP provider.

So the problem is the “Reverse Lookup Zone”, the DNS server did not create a related “Reverse Lookup Zone” automatically, you should create it manually by yourself 

OK, found the root cause and let’s fix it

Right click on Reverse Lookup Zone, click on New Zone

Create a Primary Zone

Type in your “Network ID” which is your network subnet

Select the Reverse lookup zone, now you got the right name, next

do ipconfig \flushdns and check

Question: NSLOOKUP RESPONSE DEFAULT SERVER UNKNOWN, ADDRESS ::1

NSLOOKUP RESPONSE DEFAULT SERVER UNKNOWN, ADDRESS ::1

When I do a nslookup, I get the response listed below:

C:\Windows\system32>nslookup

Default Server:  UnKnown

Address:  ::1

As far as I can verify, EDNS0 is disabled, PTR records exist for the server in the zone. Also, on the server, if I uncheck the IPv6 protocol in the TCP/IP properties of the NIC, this issue goes away.

RESOLUTION:

Check the IPv6 settings to obtain DNS server address automatically

Change the preferred DNS server from ::1 to obtain DNS server address automatically.

Question: DNS Server : nslookup response “Default Server Unknown

DNS Server : nslookup response “Default Server Unknown

Recently, I got a power Failure in my Data Center and face an Active Directory/DNS Crash as well. I configured Active Directory and DNS as well to support my users and organization and AD start replication but after a day I notice that on nslookup there was a message Default Server: Unknown. Ooops! I was really, really worried that what happens to it. Obviously, I start troubleshooting and the solution was much unexpected to me.

Solution 1:

You need to login your DNS Server and if you haven’t setup your reverse lookup zone, please do create it. If it’s already done than you need to create a PTR Record and point to 192.168.10.10 Server (in my example). After creating PTR Record or configuring Reverse lookup zone, you will be able to see Server Name, as image below.

Solution 2:

In some cases, your DNS may behave differently like it shows exact Default Server Name but on giving any website name (google.com), it show error message like “request timed out. timeout was 2 seconds” etc. in this case you have to check your Firewall on DNS Server or any Firewall between your computer and DNS Server and you have to allow your DNS Server.

Solution 3:

You may notice that even disabling Firewall on DNS Server, Local Computer or even allowing DNS Server in middle Firewall doesn’t help then you must check that your DNS Server have properly configured for Live DNS Server’s. Please double check Live DNS IP Address in DNS Forwarders and hope these tips will help you, please show yourself in comments to improve the post.

Question: Windows 2008/2012 DNS Nslookup request timed out // Default server: Unknown Address: ::1

Windows 2008/2012 DNS Nslookup request timed out // Default server: Unknown Address: :: 1

3 answers

If on a domain controller that is DNS you have the following error after running the nslookup command:

DNS Nslookup request timed out 

Timeout was 2 seconds. 

Default server: Unknown 

Address: :: 1

it’s just that your server is trying to interrogate (DNS) in IPV6

the bad solution is to disable the IPV6 in the settings of the network card:

If you disable IPV6 on your 2008/2012 server you lose the following features:

– Remote Assistance– Windows Meeting Space (P2P)– Homegroup– DirectAccess– Client Side Caching (offline files) and BranchCache (Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows 7)

source:

http://blogs.technet.com/b/windows_networking_fr/archive/2011/09/26/ipv6-versus-ipv4-comment-prioriser-les-flux-ipv4-dans-windows.aspx

The good practice if you do not want to manage the ip V6 in the DNS, is to disable the IPV6 but on the DNS interface:

In the DNS console right-click on your server, then choose Properties

Here we see that IPV4 and IPV6 are enabled

select Only the following IP addresses , leave the address in IPV4 and click OK

I used a MS fix on my controller Domain to prefer ipV4 to ipV6

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929852/en-us

it should work afterwards

Question: nslookup returns server unknown

I am not sure if I have a reason to be uncomfortable but the results below do make me uncomfortable. Note that I do not have any problems accessing my network resources and the internet from any program. However…

Here is the ipconfig on my pc:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : mydomain.com

   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) Centrino(R) Advanced-N 6230

   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 88-53-2E-30-87-75

   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes

   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : fcee:4:7:9:0:6:3ede:f16d(Preferred)

   Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Saturday, February 02, 2013 1:32:46 PM

   Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Thursday, February 14, 2013 1:32:45 PM

   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::3039:a6e1:8fc:9bec%13(Preferred)

   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.162(Preferred)

   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0

   Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Sunday, February 03, 2013 12:18:48 PM

   Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Sunday, February 03, 2013 1:18:47 PM

   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.17

   DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.123

   DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 327701294

   DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-18-4C-D3-C3-14-FE-B5-C1-FD-04

   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fcee:4:7:9:10::

                                       fcee:4:7:9:11::

                                       192.168.63.122

                                       192.168.63.123

   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix Search List :

                                       mydomain.com

And here is the reason for concern (ran on my pc):

C:\Windows\system32>nslookup www.yahoo.com

        Server:  UnKnown

        Address:  fcee:4:7:9:10::

        *** UnKnown can’t find www.yahoo.com: No response from server

But if I specify explicitly any of the DNS servers:

        C:\Windows\system32>nslookup www.yahoo.com white

        Server:  white.mydomain.com

        Address:  192.168.63.122

        Non-authoritative answer:

        Name:    ds-any-fp3-real.wa1.b.yahoo.com

        Addresses:  2001:4998:f00b:1fe::3001

                  2001:4998:f00b:1fe::3000

                  2001:4998:f00d:1fe::3001

                  98.139.183.24

        Aliases:  www.yahoo.com

                  fd-fp3.wg1.b.yahoo.com

                  ds-fp3.wg1.b.yahoo.com

                  ds-any-fp3-lfb.wa1.b.yahoo.com

Or

        C:\Windows\system32>nslookup www.yahoo.com skylark

        Server:  skylark.mydomain.com

        Address:  192.168.63.123

        Non-authoritative answer:

        Name:    ds-any-fp3-real.wa1.b.yahoo.com

        Addresses:  2001:4998:f00b:1fe::3001

                  2001:4998:f00b:1fe::3000

                  98.139.183.24

        Aliases:  www.yahoo.com

                  fd-fp3.wg1.b.yahoo.com

                  ds-fp3.wg1.b.yahoo.com

                  ds-any-fp3-lfb.wa1.b.yahoo.com

Ping works fine (as any other app out there that I tried):

C:\Windows\system32>ping www.yahoo.com

        Pinging ds-any-fp3-real.wa1.b.yahoo.com [98.139.183.24] with 32 bytes of data:

        Reply from 98.139.183.24: bytes=32 time=59ms TTL=47

        Reply from 98.139.183.24: bytes=32 time=72ms TTL=49

        Reply from 98.139.183.24: bytes=32 time=121ms TTL=47

        Reply from 98.139.183.24: bytes=32 time=105ms TTL=49

        Ping statistics for 98.139.183.24:

            Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),

        Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:

            Minimum = 59ms, Maximum = 121ms, Average = 89ms

More about the environment:

        – Very small domain – two AD servers (both Windows Server 2012), two computers (running Windows 8) and three or four devices (printer, phone, WiFi access point, etc.).

        – The network (DHCP, DNS, servers and gateway static addresses etc.) is both IPv4 and IPv6.

        – There are DNS running on both DC servers.

        – The servers have static IPv4 and 6 addresses.

        – The servers have both DNS addresses (both IPv4 and 6) in their IP configuration.

        – Single forward lookup zone – mydomain.com (and of course _msdcs…).

        – Two reverse lookup zones one for IPv4 and one for IPv6.

        – DHCP has the two DNS servers in the options.

Call me old-fashioned but I’ve been using “nslookup yahoo.com” to diagnose my network problems for years and now when it doesn’t answer unless i specify the dns server, makes me nervous. Am I right and if I am can you suggest possible problems in my configrations.

Answer:

It’s only showing “unknown” for the IPv6 address.

Go into your IPv6 properties, and set the IP and DNS address settings to be obtained automatically.

Then in Manage network adapters windows, change the view options to show Menu, then click on Advanced, Advanced, and make sure IPv4 is on top instead of IPv6.

Answer:

It’s only showing “unknown” for the IPv6 address.

Go into your IPv6 properties, and set the IP and DNS address settings to be obtained automatically.

Then in Manage network adapters windows, change the view options to show Menu, then click on Advanced, Advanced, and make sure IPv4 is on top instead of IPv6.

Answer:

Everything was exactly the way you suggested… Then I played with the order: v6 before v4 just to try and see – got worse. Reversed back to v4 before v6 – and almost all is looking good with the exception of Server: UnKnown (like I said in the original post I do have rev. lookup zone). But this is something I can live with (unless you or somebody else has other suggestion). I am marking your reply as the solution.

Thank you very much!

Answer:

I’m sure you’ve figured this out by now. Although the recommendation from ACE is correct there is possibly another issue. 

1. Open Network and Sharing Center

2. Change adapter settings.

3. Selection connection, right-click and choose properties of the network connection.

4. Double-click the IPv6 tcpip settings.

Determine if your IPv6 setting is as shown. If so, change it to “Obtain DNS server …”

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